Internalized Sexual Shame in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Internalized Sexual Shame in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

An endless supply of shame sources exist for our clients. When the clinician has increased awareness of typical shameful experiences, it allows for better history-taking, case conceptualization, and ultimately client success.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️ by Lauren Kiser, Ph.D. and DaLene Forester, Ph.D.

 


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Resilience: The Intersection of Eating Disorders and EMDR

Resilience: The Intersection of Eating Disorders and EMDR

Resilience is more than a buzzword circulating throughout the therapy community and among the general population. Resilience is a competency that can be learned and developed through treating trauma and in the context of eating disorder (ED) recovery.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️ by Erica Faulhaber, MA, NCC, LPC, CEDS.


An open access version of this article is available at EMDRIA’s Focal Point blog EMDR and Eating Disorders, published December 15, 2023. 

 


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EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders (Go With That Magazine™️ Issue)

EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders

Go With That Magazine™️ Fall 2023

According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), eating disorders affect at least 9 percent of the population worldwide. Eating disorders are among the deadliest mental illnesses, second only to opioid overdose. The statistics for BIPOC and LGBTQA+ populations are more dismal, mainly because of missed opportunities by their doctors. With so many people suffering, how can EMDR therapists help? What do you need to know so you do not miss the signs, and what can you do to help heal? This issue’s authors, who focus their EMDR therapy practices on helping clients or patients with disordered eating, share what they know.

Articles

This issue includes the following articles:

 


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Counselor’s Corner on Negative Cognitions

Counselor’s Corner on Negative Cognitions

In the Counselor’s Corner column, EMDR therapists respond to the question of Clint White who asks: “Hi all! I’m working with a 62-year-old male who retired three years ago after working for 40 years as a EMT. When completing his trauma history, he was able to identify the negative cognition (NC) for the five events that have occurred since he retired. However, he could not identify the NC for most of the events that he encountered as a first responder. I have tried to reword the question in various ways such as, ‘What is the untrue thought that you have about yourself that intellectually you know is not true?’ or ‘What is the lie that you tell yourself about yourself?’ I have reviewed the cognitions list with the client as well as having had several conversations with the client trying to help identify the NC. But, to no avail. The client can’t seem to identify the NC. Does anyone have any recommendations regarding any other steps I can take in this situation? Any help would be greatly appreciated!”

Read responses from Carolina Radovan, North Vancouver, BC, Canada; Shon Howell, Chicago IL; Lydia Carrick, Seattle, WA; Dr. Michelle Morrissey, Pueblo, CO; and Lauren Stinson, MS, LPC, NCC.

This question and responses originally appeared in the Central Forum online community. The answers have been edited and condensed for clarity and space. To view the entire discussion, members can visit www.emdria.org/emdria-community.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️.

 


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BIPOC Perspective on Eating Disorders

BIPOC Perspective on Eating Disorders

In the BIPOC Perspective column, EMDR therapists respond to the question: “Could you offer a specific example of how some aspect of a client’s culture/race was significant as a resource and/or as a challenge in the use of EMDR with a client struggling with an eating disorder or disordered eating?”

Contributors include Elizabeth Sanchez, LMFT, Certified EMDR Therapist, Approved EMDR Consultant, Certified Brainspotting Therapist, Desyree Dixon, Doctoral Candidate EdD, Organizational Change and Leadership, LCSW-C, EMDR Certified Therapist and Consultant; and Cheryl Kenn, LCSW, EMDR Trainer and Consultant.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️.

 


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Eating Disorders: What Are EMDR Therapists Missing?

Eating Disorders: What Are EMDR Therapists Missing?

If you are an EMDR therapist, it’s more likely than not that clients with disordered eating will walk through your door sooner or later—even if you are not an eating disorder specialist. There are two main reasons for this: disordered eating is extremely prevalent in the United States, and not all clients with it identify themselves as such or seek treatment focused on that.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️ by Samantha Sessamen, LMHC.

 


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An AIP Approach to Disordered Eating

An AIP Approach to Disordered Eating

EMDR therapy offers a valuable adjunctive approach to disordered eating treatment that goes beyond food and behaviors and heals at the root, where maladaptively stored experiences form the core driving force underlying disordered eating.

Read more in this article from the Fall 2023 issue EMDR Therapy & Eating Disorders of Go With That Magazine™️ by Cassie Krajewski, LAC, CST.

 


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